Historical figures


Anne Vaux

Anne Vaux (c. 1562 – in or after 1637) was a wealthy Catholic recusant. She was a relative of Francis Tresham, one of the conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 to blow up the Houses of Parliament, but had no direct involvement in the plot herself.

Diana Beaumont

Diana Beaumont (1765–1831) née Wentworth was the eldest illegitimate daughter of Sir Thomas Wentworth of Bretton Hall near Wakefield in Yorkshire.

Elizabeth Tyldesley

Elizabeth Tyldesley (1585–1654) was a 17th-century abbess at the Poor Clare Convent at Gravelines.

George Ferguson (Lt Governor of Tobago)

George Ferguson (1748 – 29 December 1820) was the fourth Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in the Buchan area of Aberdeenshire, Scotland which became known as The Blenheim of the North.

George Marsh

George Marsh, a Protestant priest who became a martyr, was born in the parish of Deane near Bolton in 1515. He died at Boughton, Chester, on 24 April 1555 as a result of the Marian Persecutions during the reign of Queen Mary I.

George Ogilvy, 3rd Lord Banff

Inherited the lands of Inchdrewer and Montbray in 1668. He was murdered and his body burned at Inchdrewer Castle in 1713.

Guy Fawkes

Guy Fawkes was a member of the group of English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

James Ferguson (Scottish politician)

James Ferguson (25 May 1735 – 6 September 1820) was a Scottish advocate and Tory politician and the third Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in the Buchan area of northeast Scotland, which is known as the ‘Blenheim of the North’.

James Ferguson, Lord Pitfour

James Ferguson, Lord Pitfour was a Scottish advocate and second Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in Buchan. He was elevated to the bench in 1764.

James Wood

James Wood (1672–1759) was a Presbyterian minister of the first Atherton and Chowbent Chapels in Atherton, Lancashire, England.

Jamie Fleeman

Jamie Fleeman or Fleeming (1713–1778) was better known as “the Laird of Udny’s Fool” or “the Laird of Udny’s Fule” in the Scots language.

Ralph of Coggeshall

Ralph of Coggeshall, Abbot of Coggeshall Abbey, was a major contributor to the early history of England known as the Chronicon Anglicanum, in which he included several anecdotes that have become folk tales.

Thomas Tyldesley

Sir Thomas Tyldesley (1612 – 25 August 1651) was a supporter of Charles I and a Royalist commander during the English Civil War.

William Cragh

Born in about 1262, William Cragh was a medieval Welsh warrior whose supposed resurrection after having been hanged for the killing of thirteen men, was one of the 38 miracles presented to the Vatican to justify the canonisation of St Thomas de Cantilupe.

William Hulton

William Hulton was the magistrate who ordered the yeomanry to charge into the crowd at the Peterloo Massacre.