History


1996 Manchester bombing

The 1996 Manchester bombing was an attack carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army on Saturday 15 June 1996, when they detonated a 15,000 kg bomb in the centre of Manchester, England.

Anne Vaux

Anne Vaux (c. 1562 – in or after 1637) was a wealthy Catholic recusant. She was a relative of Francis Tresham, one of the conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 to blow up the Houses of Parliament, but had no direct involvement in the plot herself.

Arthington Priory

Arthington Priory, founded in the mid-12th century, was a nunnery or convent that was home to a community of about ten nuns in Arthington, Yorkshire.

Atterbury Plot

The Atterbury Plot (1721–1722) was a conspiracy named after Francis Atterbury, Bishop of Rochester and Dean of Westminster, aimed at restoring the House of Stuart to the throne of Great Britain.

Battle of Howe Bridge

The Battle of Howe Bridge took place on 4 February 1881 against the background of an acrimonious strike by 50,000 miners from pits on the Lancashire coalfield that was characterised by mobs of miners picketing working pits.

Bedford Colliery explosion

The Bedford Colliery disaster occurred on Friday 13 August 1886 when an explosion of firedamp caused the death of thirty-eight miners at Bedford No.2 Pit in Leigh, on the Lancashire Coalfield.

Beeston Castle

Beeston Castle in Beeston, Cheshire, England was built in the 1220s by Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester, (1170–1232), on his return from the Fifth Crusade.

British Premonitions Bureau

The British Premonitions Bureau was set up by the psychiatrist John Barker in 1966 in the wake of the Aberfan disaster. Its aim was to collect premonitions from members of the public in the hope of being able to issue warnings about similar tragedies in the future.

Castle Hill

Castle Hill is a scheduled ancient monument overlooking Huddersfield in Kirklees, West Yorkshire.

Cheetham Close

Cheetham Close, a hill in the West Pennine Moors above Turton in Lancashire, is the site of an ancient stone circle.

Cluny Castle

Cluny Castle was originally built in about 1604 as a Z-plan castle replacing either a house or small peel tower. Sited in the parish of Cluny, it is south of Monymusk and north of Sauchen in Aberdeenshire, north-east Scotland.

Combination Acts

The Combination Acts were passed by the Tory government of William Pitt the Younger in response to its fear of unrest or revolution among the working classes. They banned workers from combining to form trade unions and prevented them from striking, calling for shorter hours or increased pay.

Crathes Castle

Crathes Castle, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland is a classic Scottish tower house, built in the 16th century.

Diana Beaumont

Diana Beaumont (1765–1831) née Wentworth was the eldest illegitimate daughter of Sir Thomas Wentworth of Bretton Hall near Wakefield in Yorkshire.

Dick Turpin

Dick Turpin was an English highwayman whose exploits were romanticised following his execution in York for horse theft. In the popular imagination he is best remembered for a fictional 200-mile ride from London to York on his horse Black Bess.

Dunham Castle

An early medieval moated motte and bailey castle just to the northwest of present-day Dunham Massey Hall in Greater Manchester, England.

Elizabeth Tyldesley

Elizabeth Tyldesley (1585–1654) was a 17th-century abbess at the Poor Clare Convent at Gravelines.

Flora MacDonald

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 4 March 1790) is a Jacobite heroine remembered for her role in the escape of the Young Pretender to the thrones of England and Scotland, Charles Edward Stewart, commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie, after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

George Arthur Ferguson, 6th Laird of Pitfour

George Arthur Ferguson, the 6th and final laird of the Pitfour estate in Aberdeenshire, the Blenheim of the North.

George Ferguson (Lt Governor of Tobago)

George Ferguson (1748 – 29 December 1820) was the fourth Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in the Buchan area of Aberdeenshire, Scotland which became known as The Blenheim of the North.

George Ferguson, 5th Laird of Pitfour

George Ferguson, the 5th laird of Pitfour in Aberdeenshire, was a Scottish officer of the Royal Navy and Tory politician.

George Marsh

George Marsh, a Protestant priest who became a martyr, was born in the parish of Deane near Bolton in 1515. He died at Boughton, Chester, on 24 April 1555 as a result of the Marian Persecutions during the reign of Queen Mary I.

George Ogilvy, 3rd Lord Banff

Inherited the lands of Inchdrewer and Montbray in 1668. He was murdered and his body burned at Inchdrewer Castle in 1713.

George Tutill

Artist and entrepreneur who started a business at the age of 20, manufacturing banners and regalia.

Gunpowder Plot

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was an attempt to assassinate King James I and re-establish a Catholic monarchy by blowing up the House of Lords.

Guy Fawkes

Guy Fawkes was a member of the group of English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

Henry Garnet

Henry Garnet was an English Jesuit priest executed for his complicity in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

Huskar Pit Disaster

The Huskar Pit disaster occurred on 4 July 1838 when twenty-six boys and girls who were working underground were drowned by an overflowing stream.

Inchdrewer Castle

A 16th-century tower house in the parish of Banff, Aberdeenshire, in the northeast of Scotland.

James Ferguson (Scottish politician)

James Ferguson (25 May 1735 – 6 September 1820) was a Scottish advocate and Tory politician and the third Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in the Buchan area of northeast Scotland, which is known as the ‘Blenheim of the North’.

James Ferguson, 1st Laird of Pitfour

Scottish lawyer and the 1st Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in the Buchan area of north-east Scotland.

James Ferguson, Lord Pitfour

James Ferguson, Lord Pitfour was a Scottish advocate and second Laird of Pitfour, a large estate in Buchan. He was elevated to the bench in 1764.

James Wood

James Wood (1672–1759) was a Presbyterian minister of the first Atherton and Chowbent Chapels in Atherton, Lancashire, England.

Jamie Fleeman

Jamie Fleeman or Fleeming (1713–1778) was better known as “the Laird of Udny’s Fool” or “the Laird of Udny’s Fule” in the Scots language.

John Nevison

John Nevison (died 4 May 1684) was one of Britain’s most notorious highwaymen.

Leighth Feight

The Leighth Feight was a clash between Chartists and police in Leigh in Lancashire in August 1839.

Manchester Blitz

The Manchester Blitz (also known as the Christmas Blitz) was the heavy bombing of the city of Manchester and its surrounding areas in North West England during the Second World War by the Nazi German Luftwaffe.

Manchester Martyrs

The Manchester Martyrs – William Philip Allen, Michael Larkin, and Michael O’Brien – were three men executed for the murder of a police officer in Manchester, England, in 1867

Masbro’ boat disaster

Sixty-four people, mainly children, were drowned in the River Don in Masbrough, Yorkshire, on 5 July 1841 when the launch of a boat went wrong.

Mellor hill fort

Mellor hill fort is a prehistoric site dating from the British Iron Age, situated on a hill in the village of Mellor, Greater Manchester, on the western edge of the Peak District.

Mining disasters in Lancashire

Mining disasters in Lancashire in which five or more people were killed occurred most frequently in the 1850s, 1860s and 1870s.

Monastic grange

Monastic granges were outlying landholdings held by monasteries independent of the manorial system. They could be of six known types: agrarian, bercaries (sheep farms), vaccaries (cattle farms), horse studs, fisheries or industrial complexes.

Peterloo Massacre

The Peterloo Massacre (or Battle of Peterloo) occurred at St Peter’s Field, Manchester, England, on 16 August 1819, when cavalry charged into a crowd of 60,000–80,000 that had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation.

Plague stones

Hollowed out stones or boulders, relics of a time when plagues spread through the country in medieval times. They hollows were filled with vinegar and placed at or near parish boundaries in attempt to prevent the spread of the disease by disinfecting coins.

Power-loom riots

The power-loom riots of 1826 took place in Lancashire, England, in protest against the economic hardship suffered by traditional hand loom weavers caused by the widespread introduction of the much more efficient power loom.

Ralph of Coggeshall

Ralph of Coggeshall, Abbot of Coggeshall Abbey, was a major contributor to the early history of England known as the Chronicon Anglicanum, in which he included several anecdotes that have become folk tales.

Sandal Castle

A ruined medieval castle in Sandal Magna, Wakefield in West Yorkshire, England. One of two castles built overlooking the River Calder, it was built by the Warrennes, the Earls of Surrey who were Lords of the Manor of Wakefield.

Scottish tower house

Characteristic style of Scottish castle building in the form of a tall tower, surrounded by one or more wings in L or Z-shaped floor plans in its later development.

Skelmanthorpe flag

The Skelmanthorpe flag in Skelmanthorpe near Huddersfield in Yorkshire in 1819, to honour the victims of the Peterloo Massacre.

Slack Roman Fort

Slack Roman Fort, a castellum (fort) in the Roman province of Britannia may have been the Cambodunum mentioned as a station on this route in the Antonine Itinerary.

Thomas Tyldesley

Sir Thomas Tyldesley (1612 – 25 August 1651) was a supporter of Charles I and a Royalist commander during the English Civil War.

Udny Castle

Udny Castle is a tower house in the parish of Udny, southwest of the village of Pitmedden and northeast of the hamlet of Udny Green, Aberdeenshire, in the northeast of Scotland.

Ullerwood Castle

An early medieval fortification, possibly a shell keep, in Ringway, Greater Manchester, England.

Wakefield Castle

Wakefield Castle, Lowe Hill or Lawe Hill was a fortification built in the 12th century on a hill on the north side of the River Calder near Wakefield, England.

Waldegrave Conspiracy

The Waldregrave Conspiracy of 1561 was a supposed plot to kill Queen Elizabeth I and reintroduce Catholicism to England.

William Cragh

Born in about 1262, William Cragh was a medieval Welsh warrior whose supposed resurrection after having been hanged for the killing of thirteen men, was one of the 38 miracles presented to the Vatican to justify the canonisation of St Thomas de Cantilupe.

William Hulton

William Hulton was the magistrate who ordered the yeomanry to charge into the crowd at the Peterloo Massacre.