See caption
Lancet windows at Hexham Abbey
Source: Wikimedia Commons

A lancet window is tall and narrow, topped by a pointed arch, and is typically associated with the English Gothic architectural style of the late 12th to the mid-13th century,[1] introduced from France.[2] The name derives from the window’s resemblance to the lance carried by a knight.[3]

The term lancet window is properly applied to windows without tracery,[4] an architectural device that divides windows into smaller sections by the insertion of stonework to support the glass.[5]

References



Bibliography


Clarke, Michael. “Lancet.” Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms, Online, Oxford University Press, 2010, https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199569922.001.0001/acref-9780199569922-e-978.
Darvill, Timothy. “Gothic.” The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology, Oxford University Press, 2021, https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191842788.001.0001/acref-9780191842788-e-1659.
Darvill, Timothy. “Tracery.” The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology, Oxford University Press, 2021, https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191842788.001.0001/acref-9780191842788-e-4316.
Hey, David. “Early English Architecture.” Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History, Oxford University Press, 2003, https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780198600800.001.0001/acref-9780198600800-e-483.
Reilly, Diane J. “Lancet Window.” Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, edited by Robert E. Bjork, Online, Oxford University Press, 2010, https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199569922.001.0001/acref-9780199569922-e-54.