See caption
Picquot ware set including milk jug, sugar bowl with lid, kettle and coffee pot.
Wikimedia Commons

Picquot ware is a type of tableware made from a magnesium-aluminium alloy called magnailium,[a]Magnailium consists of 5% magnesium and 95% aluminium. which has a silver-like look after polishing. It was produced in the Northampton factory of Burrage & Boyde from 1947 until 1980.[1]

Burrage & Boyde’s main business was the production of non-electric vacuum cleaners, marketed under the Newmaid label, the principal components of which were made from cast aluminium. In looking for additional products that could be made by taking advantage of their on-site aluminium foundry they decided on a range of high-class tableware, beginning with a 3-pint (5.3 L) kettle made from a single casting. The product was ready to be launched in 1939, but the outbreak of the Second World War resulted in the factory being diverted to the production of ammunition.[2]

The kettle was finally launched at the British Industries Fair of 1946–1947, branded as Newmaid, and was well received. It was chosen for the 1951 British Can Make It exhibition in London, and later that year it was exhibited by the Design Centre, when the brand name was changed to Picquotware.[b]Some sources claim that the kettle was designed by Jean Picquot, for which there is no evidence whatsoever. Following its successful reception, other items of table ware were added to the range.[2]

Burrage & Boyde went into receivership in 1980, and the Picquot brand name was sold to Metal Box.[2]

Notes

Notes
a Magnailium consists of 5% magnesium and 95% aluminium.
b Some sources claim that the kettle was designed by Jean Picquot, for which there is no evidence whatsoever.

References



Bibliography


Museum of Power. Burrage and Boyde from Graces Guide. http://www.museumofpower.org.uk/Burrage_and_Boyde.html.
The Dinnerware Museum. Tea. http://dinnerwaremuseum.org/tea/tea09.html.