See caption
H. G. Wells, c. 1918
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Thirty Strange Stories is a collection of short stories written by the English author H. G. Wells (1866–1946), published in the United States in 1897. Two of the stories included – “Le Mari Terrible” and “The Rajahs TreasureShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1896, about a rajah who is murdered by his heir, for an unexpected treasure trove.” – never appeared in book form in Britain.[1]

Contents


Stories are shown in the order in which they appear in the book, which is not necessarily the order in which they first appeared in print.

  • The Strange OrchidShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894. A collector of orchids grows an unknown species which develops aerial rootlets that attach themselves to his skin and suck his blood.” (1894)
  • Æpyornis IslandShort story by H. G. Wells, first published in 1894, which can be read as a Robinsonade, a parable on the theme of loneliness, or simply a ripping yarn in the manner of Rudyard Kipling.” (1894)
  • The Plattner StoryShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1896, about a chemistry teacher who causes an explosion that propels him into another world.” (1896)
  • The Argonauts of the AirShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1895, about the disastrous first flight of a heavier-than-air flying machine.” (1895)
  • The Story of the Late Mr. ElveshamShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about a young man whose body is taken over by an elderly philosopher.” (1896)
  • The Stolen BacillusShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894, about an anarchist who steals what he believes to be a tube of cholera bacteria to poison London's water supply, but which is in reality harmless.” (1894)
  • The Red RoomShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, a horror story in the manner of Edgar Allan Poe.” (1896)
  • The MothA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1895. It concerns a bitter rivalry between two entomologists, ending with the death of one and the insanity of the other.” (1896)
  • In the Abyss”A short story by H. G. Wells first published in the August 1896 edition of Pearson’s Magazine. It tells of a descent to the deep ocean bed and an encounter with a previously unknown undersea civilisation. (1896)
  • Slip Under the KnifeShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about an out of body experience while under anaesthetic.” (1896)
  • The ReconciliationShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1895, about two men who attempt a reconciliation culminating in the death of one of them.
  • A Slip Under the MicroscopeShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about the ethical dilemma faced by a student who inadvertently cheats during his botany exam.” (1896)
  • In the Avu ObservatoryShort story by H. G. Wells, about an attack by a large bat-like creature on an assistant at an observatory in Borneo.” (1894)
  • The Triumphs of a TaxidermistHumorous short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894.” (1894)
  • A Deal in OstrichesShort story by H. G. Wells, published in 1894. A confidence trick involving an ostrich that allegedly swallowed a diamond displays the extent of human greed.” (1894)
  • The Rajah’s TreasureShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1896, about a rajah who is murdered by his heir, for an unexpected treasure trove.
  • The Remarkable Case of Davidson’s EyesShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1895, about a researcher who, after stooping between the poles of a large electromagnet, becomes temporarily blind to the world around him, seeing only an island beach.” (1895)
  • The ConeShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1895, about one man's revenge on an artist he suspects is having an affair with his wife.” (1895)
  • The Purple PileusShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about a struggling small shopkeeper whose life is transformed after consuming some magic mushrooms.” (1896)
  • A CatastropheShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1895 about a struggling shopkeeper saved from bankruptcy by an unexpected legacy.” (1895)
  • “Le Mari Terrible”
  • The AppleShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1896, about a schoolmaster who comes into possession of an apple from the Tree of Knowledge.” (1896)
  • The Sad Story of a Dramatic CriticRedirected to "The Obliterated Man".” (1895)
  • The Jilting of JaneShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894, about an episode in the romantic life of a young maidservant who is engaged to be married.” (1894)
  • The Lost InheritanceShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about the lost will left by a rich uncle.” (1896)
  • Pollock and the Porroh ManShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1895, about a murdered witch-doctor whose severed head haunts the man responsible for his death.” (1895)
  • The Sea-RaidersShort story by H. G. Wells, first published in 1896, about a raid by an unknown species of octopus-like creatures on the south coast of England.” (1896)
  • In the Modern Vein: An Unsympathetic Love StoryShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894, about a minor poet's infatuation with a girl he meets at a tennis party.” (1894)
  • The Lord of the DynamosShort story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894. It concerns a stoker employed at the Camberwell electric railway workshops who becomes convinced that a large dynamo is a deity, and kills his superior in a religious frenzy.” (1894)
  • The Treasure in the ForestShort story written by H. G. Wells and published in 1897, about the fate of two men who steal a treasure map from a Chinaman.” (1894)

See also


  • H. G. Wells bibliographyList of publications written by H. G. Wells during the more than fifty years of his literary career.

References



Bibliography


Hammond, J. R. An H. G. Wells Companion. The Macmillan Press, 1979.

External links