H. G. Wells (1866–1946)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

One of the most prolific writers of modern times, H. G. Wells’s writing career spanned more than fifty years.[1] During that time he produced thirty novels, the same number of scientific romances, and more then seventy short stories, along with many non-fiction works on history, science, education, politics and sociology. His output exceeds that of Dickens and Shakespeare combined.[2]

Works are listed in order of their date of first publication in each of the lists shown below.

  • The Time Machine (1895)
  • The Wonderful Visit (1895)
  • The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896)
  • The Wheels of Chance (1896)
  • The Invisible Man (1897)
  • The War of the Worlds (1898)
  • When the Sleeper Wakes (1899)
  • Love and Mr Lewisham (1900)
  • The First Men in the Moon (1901)
  • The Sea Lady (1902)
  • The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth (1904)
  • Kipps (1905)
  • A Modern Utopia (1905)
  • In the Days of the Comet (1906)
  • The War in the Air (1908)
  • Tono-Bungay (1909)
  • Ann Veronica (1909)
  • The History of Mr Polly (1910)
  • The Sleeper Awakes (1910) – revised edition of When the Sleeper Wakes (1899)
  • The New Machiavelli (1911)
  • Marriage (1912)
  • The Passionate Friends (1913)
  • The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman (1914)
  • The World Set Free (1914)
  • Bealby: A Holiday (1915)
  • Boon (1915) (as Reginald Bliss)
  • The Research Magnificent (1915)
  • Mr Britling Sees It Through (1916)
  • The Soul of a Bishop (1917)
  • Joan and Peter: The Story of an Education (1918)
  • The Undying Fire (1919)
  • The Secret Places of the Heart (1922)
  • Men Like Gods (1923)
  • The Dream (1924)
  • Christina Alberta’s Father (1925)
  • The World of William Clissold (1926)
  • Meanwhile (1927)
  • Mr. Blettsworthy on Rampole Island (1928)
  • The Autocracy of Mr. Parham (1930)
  • The Bulpington of Blup (1932)
  • The Shape of Things to Come (1933)
  • The Croquet Player (1936)
  • Brynhild (1937)
  • Star Begotten (1937)
  • The Camford Visitation (1937)
  • Apropos of Dolores (1938)
  • The Brothers (1938)
  • The Holy Terror (1939)
  • Babes in the Darkling Wood (1940)
  • All Aboard for Ararat (1940)
  • You Can’t Be Too Careful (1941)

Wells defined a short story as “a fiction that may be read in something under an hour … the only essential is that it should take from fifteen to fifty minutes to read out loud”.[3]

  • “A Tale of the Twentieth Century” (1887) – signed S.B. for Septimus Browne[2]
  • “A Talk with Gryllotalpa” (1887) – published under the pseudonym Septimus Browne[2]
  • “A Vision of the Past” (1887)
  • “The Chronic Argonauts” (1888)
  • “The Devotee of Art” (1888)
  • “Walcote” (1888–1889)
  • Æpyornis IslandA short story by H. G. Wells, first published in the Christmas 1894 edition of the Pall Mall Budget. It can be read as a Robinsonade, a parable on the theme of loneliness, or simply a ripping yarn in the manner of Rudyard Kipling.” (1894)
  • A Deal in OstrichesA short story by H. G. Wells, published in 1894. A confidence trick involving an ostrich that allegedly swallowed a diamond displays the extent of human greed.” (1894)
  • The Diamond MakerA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894, about a tramp who claims to be able to make diamonds.” (1894)
  • “A Family Elopement” (1894)
  • The Flowering of the Strange OrchidA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894. A collector of orchids grows an unknown species which develops aerial rootlets that attach themselves to his skin and suck his blood.” (1894)
  • “The Hammerpond Park Burglary” (1894)
  • “How Gabriel Became Thompson” (1894)
  • In the Avu ObservatoryA short story by H. G. Wells, about an attack by a large bat-like creature on an assistant at an observatory in Borneo.” (1894)
  • “In the Modern Vein: An Unsympathetic Love Story” (1894)
  • “The Jilting of Jane” (1894)
  • The Lord of the DynamosThe "Lord of the Dynamos " is a short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894. It concerns a stoker employed at the Camberwell electric railway workshops who becomes convinced that a large dynamo is a deity, and kills his superior in a religious frenzy.” (1894)
  • “The Man With a Nose” (1894)
  • “A Misunderstood Artist” (1894)
  • The Stolen BacillusA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894, about an anarchist who steals what he believes to be a tube of cholera bacteria to poison London's water supply, but which is in reality harmless.” (1894)
  • “The Thing in No. 7” (1894)
  • Through a WindowA short story by H. G. Wells, first published in 1894, a precursor to the sub-genre of thriller in which a crippled or bed-ridden hero, after observing the world through a window, is suddenly confronted by a killer.” (1894)
  • “The Thumbmark” (1894)
  • “The Treasure in the Forest” (1894)
  • The Triumphs of a TaxidermistA humorous short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1894.” (1894)
  • “The Argonauts of the Air” (1895)
  • “A Catastrophe” New Budget (4 April 1895)
  • “The Cone” (1895)
  • “The Flying Man” (1895)
  • “How Pingwill Was Routed” (1895)
  • “Le Mari Terrible” (1895)
  • “The Moth” (1895)
  • “Our Little Neighbour” (1895)
  • “Pollock and the Porroh Man” (1895)
  • “The Reconciliation” (1895)
  • “The Remarkable Case of Davidson’s Eyes” (1895)
  • “The Sad Story of a Dramatic Critic”(1895)
  • The Temptation of HarringayA short story by H. G. Wells, published in 1895, about an artist who paints a man's head that comes to life and criticises his work.” (1895)
  • “Wayde’s Essence” (1895)
  • “The Apple” (1896)
  • In the Abyss"In the Abyss" is a short story by H. G. Wells first published in the August 1896 edition of Pearson’s Magazine. It tells of a descent to the deep ocean bed and an encounter with a previously unknown undersea civilisation.” (1896)
  • The Plattner StoryA short story by H. G. Wells published in 1896, about a chemistry teacher who causes an explosion that propels him into another world.” (1896)
  • The Purple PileusA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about a struggling small shopkeeper whose life is transformed after consuming some magic mushrooms.” (1896)
  • “The Rajah’s Treasure” (1896)
  • The Red Room"The Red Room" is a short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, a horror story in the manner of Edgar Allan Poe.” (1896)
  • The Sea RaidersShort story by H. G. Wells, first published in 1898, about a raid by an unknown species of octopus-like creatures on the south coast of England.” (1896)
  • “A Slip Under the Microscope” (1896)
  • “The Story of the Late Mr. Elvesham” (1896)
  • Under the Knife"Under the Knife" is a short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1896, about an out of body experience while under anaesthetic.” (1896)
  • The Crystal EggA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1897, about a dealer in antiquities who discovers a communication device between Earth and Mars.” (1897)
  • “The Lost Inheritance” The Plattner Story and Others. (1897)
  • “Mr Marshall’s Doppelganger” (1897)
  • “A Perfect Gentleman on Wheels” (1897)
  • “The Presence by the Fire” (1897)
  • The Star"The Star" is a short story by H. G. Wells about a near collision between a comet from outer space and the Earth.” The Graphic (December 1897)
  • “A Story of the Stone Age” (1897)
  • Jimmy Goggles the GodA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1898, about a treasure hunter who because of his diving suit is mistaken for a god.” (1898)
  • The Man Who Could Work MiraclesA short story by H. G. Wells about a man who is granted the power to do anything merely by willing it to happen.” (1898)
  • “Miss Winchelsea’s Heart” (1898)
  • Mr. Ledbetter’s VacationMr. Ledbetter's Vacation is a short stort by H. G. Wells about a schoolmaster who, to prove his courage to himself, burgles a house while on holiday, leading him into a strange adventure.” (1898)
  • The Stolen BodyA shory story by H. G. Wells, first published in 1898, about two paranormal researchers one of whom loses his body to an evil spirit.” (1898)
  • “Mr. Brisher’s Treasure” (1899)
  • “A Story of the Days to Come” (1899)
  • A Vision of JudgmenA short story by H. G. Wells published in 1899, about the Biblical day of judgement.t” (1899)
  • “A Dream of Armageddon” (1901)
  • “Filmer” (1901)
  • Mr. Skelmersdale in FairylandA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1901, about a young man who falls asleep one midsummer's night and wakes to find himself in Fairyland.” (1901)
  • The New AcceleratorA short story by H. G. Wells published in 1901, concerning the effects of a fictional drug designed to speed up the human nervous system.” (1901)
  • The Story of the Inexperienced GhostShort story by H. G. Wells about a man who dies after re-enacting the masonic passes he had seen a ghost use to disappear.” (1902)
  • “The Loyalty of Esau Common” (1902)
  • “The Land Ironclads” (1903)
  • “The Magic Shop” (1903)
  • The Truth About PyecraftShort story by H. G. Wells published in 1903, about a fat man who loses so much weight that he begins to float.” (1903)
  • “The Valley of Spiders” (1903)
  • The Country of the Blind"The Country of the Blind" is a short story by H. G. Wells, first published in the April 1904 issue of The Strand Magazine and subsequently in book form in The Country of the Blind and Other Stories (1911)."The Country of the Blind" is a short story by H. G. Wells, first published in the April 1904 issue of The Strand Magazine and subsequently in book form in The Country of the Blind and Other Stories (1911).” (1904)
  • “The Empire of the Ants” (1905)
  • “The Door in the Wall” (1906)
  • The Beautiful Suit"The Beautiful Suit" is a short story by H. G. Wells, first published in Collier's Weekly in April 1909 under the title "A Moonlight Fable". The exquisitely tailored suit of the title, made for the little man by his mother, ultimately leads to his death.” (1909)
  • “Little Mother Up the Mörderberg” (1910)
  • “My First Aeroplane” (1910)
  • “The Story of the Last Trump” (1915)
  • “The Wild Asses of the Devil” (1915)
  • “Peter Learns Arithmetic” (1918)
  • “The Grisly Folk” (1921)
  • The Pearl of LoveA short story by H. G. Wells first published in 1925, about an Indian prince who, in constructing an elaborate memorial to his deceased wife, loses sight of the building's original purpose.” (1925)
  • The Queer Story of Brownlow’s Newspaper"The Queer Story of Brownlow's Newspaper" is a short story by H. G. Wells, in which the protagonist receives a newspaper printed forty years in the future.” (1932)
  • “Answer to Prayer” (1937)
  • The Country of the Blind"The Country of the Blind" is a short story by H. G. Wells, first published in the April 1904 issue of The Strand Magazine and subsequently in book form in The Country of the Blind and Other Stories (1911)."The Country of the Blind" is a short story by H. G. Wells, first published in the April 1904 issue of The Strand Magazine and subsequently in book form in The Country of the Blind and Other Stories (1911). (revised)” (1939)
  • “The Haunted Ceiling” (2016) Probably written in about 1895, but unpublished during Wells’s lifetime.[4]

Citations



Bibliography


Hammond, J. R. (1979). An H. G. Wells Companion. The Macmillan Press.
Sherbourne, M. (2016, November 23). Michael Sherbourne on “The Haunted Ceiling” by H. G. Wells. The Strand Magazine.
Wells, H. G. (2017). The Crystal Egg and Other Stories. (C. Watts, Ed.). Wordsworth Editions.